Snails! Handles! Glaze!

Each day in the studio brings new and exciting things.

Yes. It is true. We have got photo evidence — snails, caracols, escargots! Apparently they were delicious! Although, even after much encouragement from my peers I couldn’t bring my self to pop one in my mouth. Luckily there was a pineapple tart available too.🙂

I spent the better part of 3 hours working on the bulbous vessel — turning a foot ring, refining the form and later joining the handles. It is not a form I am immediately attracted to, so I thought perhaps 3 handles could spice things up a little. Although, they are rather large, perhaps some bold surface decoration could help the balance, let’s see how it develops. 

We had our first glimpse at the some of the decorating we will be doing during in the next week, very free and quick. The pastel green seen below transforms into a bottle green with a slightly transparent, gloss finish. Dubbed ‘verde de Alfarero’ (at least here in Spain) it translates to Potter’s green. From the snippets of Spanish I am able to pick up on, it seems to me to be somewhat traditional, although I’m struggling to find many internet examples with my obviously poor search terms. The idea is to fire the piece 3 times in total. One, the biscuit fire. Two, firing of the ‘Potter’s green’ — and a third firing for a second, honey coloured glaze! This will be applied on all the remaining, exposed areas of the piece. It is not how I imagined the pieces as I turned them, but this is all about learning and experimenting at this stage. I’m going to try and introduce some graphic elements to make it feel more like my own. So here goes — tomorrow we glaze!

Caracoles...nom nom (for some people), I just couldn't do it!

Caracoles…nom nom (for some people), I just couldn’t do it!

Monday's spread

Monday’s spread

A scored handel and the slip ready to go

A scored handel and the slip ready to go

Getting a handle on things

Getting a handle on things…not sure whether to include this lame pun or not! Ha! But, I do know some pun lovers ;) 

Snug: ready to dry slowly and evenly

Snug: ready to dry slowly and evenly

The glazing technique we will uses for at least 2 of our pieces, this is the professors example.

The glazing technique we will uses for at least 2 of our pieces, this is the professors example.

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