Number four.

Greetings to all.

Here are some pics of one of my latest pots. As the title informs — ’tis pot number four! Lucky pot number three was selected to go on display at the school, which is quite an honour!

So, the pot pictured was part of an assignment we were given (I must add a rather relaxed assignment). We worked on cross section in ‘dibujo tecnico’ where the curve was calculated to correspond with a given teapot one third of the height.

I used a white engobe for the base. Applied with a brush — the layer is quite thick in particular zones where the vertical strokes overlap, this left a linear texture. On the other hand however, some strokes obviously lacked engobe as during the glaze firing some of the terracota body became exposed (as you can see in the first 2 images). So overall not too even really — but not to worry — first attempt! A much more even layer was achieved using the spray gun with other pots.

I’m still figuring out how I feel about this one. While making it, I was definitely feeling the utilitarian vibes.  However now I am a tad confused about its use. I suppose if it were to be part of a series…. with cups and so it  could work.

Like with most things I have experienced so far in my still very young journey with ceramics, things dont really come out the way you imagine them to. This could be due to my early days, but it does seem to be a bit of a theme in the field — that element of surprise and mystery when opening the kiln! Though I do think after some years of training/practice/learning you come to understand your materials more and can obtain significantly more control over desired outcomes.

Well, there you go — another pot — another installment of experiences and learnings.

Enjoy the easter break everyone! We will be heading to the north of Spain with a few stops along the way, i’ll be sure to share some photos on pixpixnix when we return.

SophiePARKER_cdc11_p4 SophiePARKER_cdc11_p4d

Detail. Here you can see the vertical texture left by the engobe.

Detail. See the vertical texture left by the engobe.Here you can see the colour changes that took place. To the left we have the (commercial) oxidos before being fired, and to the right — after the second firing (to adhere the glaze — this is when the terracotta was exposed).Here you can see the colour changes that took place. To the left we have the (commercial) oxidos before being fired, and to the right — after the second firing (to adhere the glaze — this is when the terracotta was exposed).

 

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